Links to articles, interesting information or specific sustainably things from Pulp

Pulp: Striving for a Green Lifestyle

It’s easy to get Green Washed by products claiming to be sustainable, or to lose sight on what the importance of green or sustainable products are.  At the end of it all, the main goal is to reduce our carbon footprint and alter the impact that human behavior or man made products have on the world and the environment. It’s difficult to be completely green, and critics may point to negatives or shoot holes in green claiming products so it’s important to see where a positive impact can be made and to use that opportunity to bring constant awareness.  We’ve all heard criticism of hybrid cars, electric cars or biofuel. It might be true that they can’t replace gas powered vehicles all at once, and they each have their own potential impacts on the environment, but they are all positive developments that seek to alter and find new ways to reduce our effect on the environment while still providing a critical necessity in this world.

Plastic is a fairly new phenomenon in the world and it has especially had an impact with disposable plastic water bottles, plastic bags and similar disposable products. The products themselves are not entirely bad but their overuse and lack of control are. There are many articles about the large garbage patches in the ocean that are like a whirlpool of plastic debris. This plastic simply doesn’t decompose and affects the ocean and marine life. There are other stories of the debris breaking into small pellets and being ingested by marine life which often then gets consumed by humans.

There have been positive moves to increase awareness and alter our behavior. Recycling is now very common and reducing the unnecessary use of disposable plastic products has increased with things like reducing or eliminating plastic shopping bags and using reusable bags. It’s hard to imagine a world without plastic, and that’s where it’s important to look at changing our behavior. Plastic can be recycled, and this alone would have a huge impact on the world.

Our goal at Pulp is to continuously seek products that look and perform as well as other options out there, but to always have a sustainable aspect in mind that brings awareness to how our choice of products can help improve our carbon footprint on the world. Our line of clothing is largely made from  materials that are made from recycled plastic, rather than new raw materials. This, we believe helps promote recycling plastic and pushing manufactures to increasingly look for more sustainability in consumer products.  We will try to use this and our other products to build awareness, on how we can change our world and our environment. Being sustainable can be like being on a diet. You can’t magically change overnight and there is no magic formula. In other words you can just stop eating. It’s a process and it means being aware and making changes step by step that make it part of a life style. We hope our goal to create a brand of innovative sustainable surf lifestyle products will inspire people and bring awareness to their choices and how our behavior can impact the environment.

How Plastic Bottles are Recycled into Polyester

Mini Paipo Board with paper Based Core

Paper Based Surf Boards Boards

The name Pulp derives from our goal to make surfboards out of paper based cores by using various different paper making technologies. Paper products such as corrugated and honeycomb papers have similar characteristics to wood by offering strength and rigidity but by reducing weight. We have made numerous prototypes that have successfully been used to ride waves and paddle as SUP’s..

Why Paper? The surf industry has for a long time sought an alternative to foam based cores. Foam is lightweight, inexpensive, easy to shape and strong. Paper products share all of these qualities. The biggest problem with foam is that it has a negative impact on the environment and does not break down naturally. Paper on the other hand is recyclable, re-pulpable and would greatly reduce surfers’ carbon footprint as far as surfboard cores and the process of making them.

We know that we can make paper based boards that work, but our challenge is to make them efficiently while resulting in a product that is as good or better than industry standards. There has been a move to wood built boards, and we feel that paper can take this one step further. We hope to use this blog to document different steps in our progress.